Posts Tagged ‘great art’

How Irreplaceable Are You? (Great Art-Part 3)

It’s really not important if you want to create great art, good art, or just-for-the-heck-of-it art. The last thing I want to imply in my “Great Art” blog series is that great art is automatically the goal.

Maybe yes, maybe, no—either way it’s not a judgment, it’s a description of one possibility.

However, if great art is a deep yearning inside you, I want to make sure you don’t think of it as a futile exercise in subjective reality or the opinion of others.

There are steps you can take (See Great Art Part 1 and Part 2). And while the markers of complexity, mystery, and mastery won’t assure you of greatness, at the very least they will give you…

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Are You Hiding Behind The Beauty? (Great Art, Part 2):

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a lot that comes with being an artist to stoke the ego fires:

  • Admiration
  • The ultimate badge of specialness
  • Cascading down the river of Creativity Flow
  • Rampant self-expression
  • The delight of watching what’s around the corner coming toward you (or you toward it)
  • An unbridled sense of a purpose-driven life
  • Merging with forces that are bigger than the ego (a bit of irony, that one)
  • The ability to create beauty (as in “the eye of the beholder”)

Only, before I continue, a couple of clarifications… 

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What Makes Great Art Great? (Part 1)

Over the last six years, I’ve asked hundreds of artists how they define success through the unique Vision Questionnaire that the participants in my smARTist Telesummit fill out.

And as surprising as it was to me, an insignificant percentage defined success as producing great art. For the majority, it was an income number coming from their art – anywhere from $20,000 to $500,000 a year.

Maybe it’s because great art is associated with historical figures, museum retrospectives, and millions being thrown down on the auction block. Maybe great feels like shoes too big to fill.

Or it comes tagged with the age-old response that great is in the eye of the beholder, i.e., too subjective to pin down.

Or for women artists the persistent patriarchal overlay on great means it’s an exercise in futility, while for men great becomes a challenge that might best them even as they are doing their best.

What would change if great was not only definable, but also…

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