Posts Tagged ‘artist statement’

The NEW Professional: Part 1

new professional_ariane of smartist

Professional used to have an allure of conservative confidence instantly recognizable by the dark blue suit, skirt just below the knees, the sensible heels, perhaps pearl earrings and a thin chain of gold peeking beneath a scarf.

It was warm but reserved, attentive but distant, confident and quietly cagey. (I think it was called getting “the upper hand.”)

Then virtual reality came along and…

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Weekly smARTips: 10 Reasons For An Artist Statement

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This week’s smARTip:

10 Reasons For An Artist Statement
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1. Because an artist statement affirms what you do, and by extension affirms you.

And none of us can ever have too much affirmation.

2. Because an artist statement calls out for you to recognize the true faces of your deepest self: truth, beauty, and goodness.

3. Because an artist statement invites you to experience another level of awareness about yourself and your art.

4. Because an artist statement strengthens the relationship you have with your work.

5. Because an artist statement builds a compelling bridge between your audience and your art.

6. Because an artist statement enriches the connection between the artist and the art.

7. Because it is practical. You can use your artist statement for:

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8. Because it makes a deeper statement about self-trust, that you trust yourself enough to flow into another dimension of expression.

9. Because it is a powerful experience to use the tool of language to support what you love

10. Because you can.

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Your smARTist Move of the week:

I really don’t care which reason reaches into your psyche and moves you to action.

Just pick one and go for it!
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btw – if going for it feels more confusing than it should, seriously check out my book because I go to great lengths to make crafting your artist statement easy and satisfying.

Click here to check out my special before next Monday, when it all comes down!  http://writingtheartiststatement.com/

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Weekly smARTips: Kindred Spirits: Social Media & Artist Statements

Social Media and Artist Statements

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This week’s smARTip:

Kindred Spirits: Social Media & Artist Statements
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I’m not really a fan of the truism “nothing new under the sun” (one example being that there was no book about artist statements until I wrote it).

But I do find it curious that what’s at the heart of social media and artist statements is the same thing…

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Live Call! Ariane Reviews 2 Artist Statements & Answers Your Questions

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Come join me Wednesday, December 11th as I review 2 artist statements and share some other golden nuggets for you and your art!

We will talk about how to use your artist statement to expand the range of your connection with your viewers because… the more connections, the stickier you and your art becomes. The stickier you and your art become, the more they remember you!

Revealing what, how and why you do your art does not dismantle either the beauty or mystery of it. Quite the opposite. Your effort to reach out invites others to participate in the mystery and to share the beauty.

Here’s the scoop….

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A Live Call with Ariane on

Wednesday, December 11th

7pm ET/ 6pm CT / 5pm MT / 4pm PT

Sign up right here to come live or get the recording afterwards!







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I look forward to revealing the true spirit of your work!

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Where In The World is What?

th-1I’ve been obsessed lately with the cross-over metaphor of the 1% / 99% within our political/social arena to the art world.

I’ve also had some push back from artists who get the impression that, in offering this frame of reference, it implies I’m advocating for upward mobility for the 99%.

Definitely not. Besides you can’t squeeze 100% into 1% no matter how much you might want to.

Much like the frame of reference around gender in the last post, I can’t help but feel there’s gold in them thar hills when we understand more, rather than less, about how the reality around us is actually working.

I’ve been immersing myself in a stack of books: The $12 Million Stuffed Shark by Don Thompson, The Girl With The Gallery by Lindsay Pollack, Contemporary Art by Julian Stallabrass, Corporate Art Collections by Charlotte Appleyard and James Salzmann (and about 4 more I’m too lazy to get up and go look at the exact titles).

Without exception, these deal in what I’m loosely calling the 1% of the art world: auction house, high-end galleries/dealers, the Big Collectors, artists who might have once been in the 99%, but are soon catapulted into the 1% arena with a combination of sales, personality, pure talent, and most likely also a man.

The only exception to this is our heroine in The Girl With The Gallery by Lindsay Pollack, Edith Halpert. Until Ms. Pollack (current Editor-in-Chief of Art in America) unearthed Edith, she was all but dead to…

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When Small Things Snowball

When I first started selling my book on Writing the Artist Statement the shopping cart installed on my website malfunctioned.

Now, mind you, I didn’t know this at the time. I just thought no one was buying my book. Since I’m always into the next project on my inner to-do list, I pretty much let it go at that.

Far be it from me to force anyone to buy my book! [Which, in those early days, meant I equated selling used cars to book selling, and wasn’t about to get my hands “dirty.”]

Then something unremarkable happened…

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What Do I Really, Really, Really Want?

I don’t know about you, but I’ve spent a chunk of my lifetime asking, “What do you want?”

I ask my daughters this. I ask my clients. I ask my neighbor.

Tonight, in the kitchen, returning from a date in Northampton (a ton of fun!), I leaned on the counter, hung my head and heard myself ask out loud, What… do… I… want?

I had been pouring myself a glass of water when a weight seemed to drop onto me, out of nowhere, and then…

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Hiding Out in Plain Sight

I know, this is not the first time I’ve disappeared from my blog.

Thank goodness for all my smARTist Telesummit Alumni whose art is a balm for bad habits. (I’m waving to every single one of you!!!)

In the past, I’ve fallen off the blog wagon because, honestly, I wasn’t inspired.

And I’d beat myself with the wet noodle of: be disciplined, grl! You don’t need to date the muse every time you write a blog post.

I would scoot over to Alyson Stanfield’s blog or Joan Stewart’s and think: why the heck (well, maybe “heck” is more PG13 than I’m fesin’ up to) can’t I do that?

Be consistent.

Be concise.

Be clear.

Have a specific action for you to take/follow.

Then I’d go right back…

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About Them & You: Two Artist Statement Secrets

The first secret is about them—the people who see your art, the people who are moved by your art, and immediately have this very human desire to know more about you, the person who moved them.

Sure, they can stand there (or move their cursor around), and stare some more. Maybe even strike up a conversation with someone next to them about what they are seeing.

“Honey, come look at this. What do you think?”

Or, you could have this killer artist statement that keeps them right there, next to your work, contemplating it even more.

Because, when you capture that next layer of insight and awareness – without detracting from your viewer’s perspective – you have…

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Do You Know What An “Artist Statement” Is?

One of the most confusing aspects of an artist statement is deciding what it is.

When I asked painter, Bob McMurray, if he had an old artist statement we could compare to the one he had just written, he said, “Not really. I wrote some things for a web site, but it’s not an artist statement. I’ve been thinking about writing one for ages, so I was primed and ready to go when I got your book.”

Imagine my surprise, when I finally surfed over, to find a perfectly coherent artist statement on the site. True, a few touch-ups and a stronger central theme would be a plus; and, what he had worked. So, why was this clear to me…

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Part 1: Art As Spiritual Sanctuary

For a long time now I’ve been intrigued by the many correlations between the visual fine arts and spirituality.

In times past, art was an extension of that uniquely human branch of spirituality: religion. It married the power of vision to the power of institutionalized religion, especially that of the four world super religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Moslem, and Judaism.

A variety of art forms were also core to the traditions and rituals of native cultures – masks, totems, body paint, body adornments, dance, theater, costumes – where spirit was an ever-present reality threaded throughout daily life and initiating or supporting major life transitions, such as birth, death, marriage, life-as-service, and so much more that I can’t even conceive.

When humans shifted the locus of their attention from the tribe, clan, and family–where individuality was invisible under the cloak of the group–to the beginnings of self-awareness.

At this point, the crest of human development used art to pour forth even more testimony to all aspects of the human-as-spirit condition, as envisioned in the private spaces of a single mind and heart, one being at a time.

And with this rise of individuals as aware of self came…

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The Lingo. Ringo. Bingo. of Social Media

When I first heard the words “social media,” I had 3 years of the smARTist Telesummit under my belt, had sold thousands of copies of my Writing The Artist Statement book, and coached dozens of private artist clients.

I barely had time to brush my teeth, much less prance around a “social” site with old high school classmates-who never gave me the time of day, way-back-when, in the first place.

I admit to a glop of self-righteousness:  I (oh, no, not I) wasn’t going to fall for this latest Internet hula hoop. I was going to stay focused on the business of serving artists. (See me, with my nose in the air?)

Then, marketing guru Adam Urbanski held a series of…

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Confidence In Your Artistic Fingerprint (Part 3 of 5)

Some people also refer to this as your artist’s voice, much like every singer has a distinct tone that cannot be duplicated, or a signature style that’s immediately recognizable (think Georgia O’Keefe or Frida Kahlo).

It is what sets you apart from the pack of ordinary work, where a dozen pair portraits from a dozen different artists could be lined up next to each other and all look as if they came from the same artist.

When your work is speaking from the level of your soul, no one can ever successfully copy you. Your artistic fingerprint is just that: yours. By definition it cannot be anyone else’s.

Only a lot of artists feel confused by the difference between loving what they have just made, and knowing the work carries a distinct sense of who they are as an artist.

An artistic fingerprint can be simple or complex, but it is never about self-duplication.

It’s something you do…

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Confidence In Your Relationship To Your Art (Part 2 of 5)

Welcome to the phantasmagorical world of Geoffrey Gorman_American Style Mag

Geoffrey Gorman, artist and partner in our Art Career Mentor Program, made a very provocative statement during one of our sessions. He said that “curiosity is the most important trait an artist can have.”

Arguably, he was referring to the making of art where an artist lubricates all parts of the process by staying open and curious about materials, about subject matter, and the message.

But I think there’s another dimension where curiosity will separate out the short pants from the long pants (now why isn’t there…

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SOFA, Red Dots, and Artist Statements

Geoffrey Gorman's "Creatures of Curiosity"

I spent a grand spring day at SOFA NY (it poured!), hobnobbing around with Geoffrey Gorman, attending a lecture by Michael Petry, the director of MOCA London on his new book The Art of Not Making, and touring all the gorgeous artwork in the two dozen gallery booths. This was a high end New York show with a clientele to match.

But for the life of me, I couldn’t keep my coaching hat off (drives my family nuts too). It was the very first booth I stepped into–because there were these stunning glass sculptures of Martin Rosol’s that simply took my breath away; I loved the clean, geometric lines, just my cup of tea–and of course I wanted to…

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